Goff Report - Irish Rugby Tours

Rugby might be a power sport, but women’s rugby is proof that the female players are no less than their male counterparts. Their participation in this sport can rightly be called a step in the right direction of gender equality. It’s proof that women are not lagging behind in strength, stamina or passion.

Is rugby the right game for women?  These awesome women who are all mentioned prove all of those stereotypes wrong.

As from records, here are the world’s top five female rugby players.  Irish Rugby Tours asks, do you agree?

1. Emily Scarratt

Top 5 Women Rugby Players

Source – World Rugby Sevens

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Scarratt earned comparisons to Brian O’Driscoll when she first burst on the Test scene as an 18-year-old in 2008, scoring 12 tries in as many games. Ever since, she has ruthlessly stamped her own brand on the women’s game.

Crowned as the world’s best player in 2019, her career has been peppered with individual moments of class which showcase her versatility at outside centre and the last 12 months have been no exception.

2. Poppy Cleall

5 Women Rugby Players

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The Saracens forward is one of England’s most resourceful players, having moved into her fourth position for her country in 2020.  Having scored a hat-trick in England’s 66-7 drubbing of Wales in last year’s Six Nations, she lined up at number eight for the Red Roses’ return autumn friendly against France.  Poppy has already played prop, lock and flanker for her country.

Her versatility has earned the plaudits of England head coach Simon Middleton, who has hailed Cleall as the “most knowledgeable” player in his squad and has also backed the 28-year-old to be one of the best athletes at the 2021 World Cup.

3. Portia Woodman

5 Women Rugby Players

Source RugbyDump.com

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Widely regarded as one of the most destructive wingers in both sevens and XVs formats in the women’s game.  Woodman was named World Rugby’s sevens player of the decade and also won 15s try of the decade for her explosive run in the 2017 World Cup final against England.

The Black Ferns star turns 30 this year but has shown no signs of slowing down in 2020.  Portia set a record of six tries in one match during New Zealand’s Falmer Cup in October.

Her biggest challenge will be to win gold at the postponed Tokyo Olympics, the one medal which still eludes her.

4. Lark Davies

World's Top 5 Women Rugby Players

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Not many hookers are found near the top of the try-scoring table.  Lark has just done that in the Premier 15s, England’s women’s premiership.  Her scoring record is nine tries in as many matches for Loughborough Lightning this season.  Her international breakthrough came for the U20 side, for which she made eight appearances.

Lark made her first international start against Italy in the 2018 Women’s Six Nations, her 10th cap overall. She then scored twice in England’s 27-19 win over Canada at Doncaster’s Castle Park in 2018. In 2019 she featured in every game of the Women’s Six Nations, and scored two tries, as the Red Roses won the Grand Slam.

5. Rachel Malcolm

World's Top 5 Women Rugby Players

Source – Scrum Magazine

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​Rachel Malcolm made her Scotland Women debut as a replacement in the first Women’s Rugby World Cup Qualifier against Spain at Scotstoun Stadium in November 2016.  She started in the Women’s Six Nations opener against Ireland at Broadwood Stadium in 2017, but sustained and injury that sidelined her for the rest of the campaign.

She took up rugby in 2015 and is currently the captain of Tyrells Premier XVs side Loughborough Lightning.  Rachel has just completed her PhD in environmental physiology and has a sports and exercise science bachelor’s degree and a masters degree in exercise physiology.  She is currently a Lecturer in Applied Sport Science at Nottingham Trent University.

Rugby might be a power sport, but women’s rugby is proof that the female players are no less than their male counterparts. Their participation in this sport can rightly be called a step in the right direction of gender equality. It’s proof that women are not lagging behind in strength, stamina or passion.

Source – Fiona Thomas, The Telegraph